Iceland 2013 Day 2
Jul 27, 2013Public
Photo: Houses in Reykjavik
Photo: A very nice house near Tjörnin ("The Pond").
Photo: A bit of mobile childrens' theater with a very small audience
Photo: Bridge over Tjörnin
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Photo: Female (diving) and male Common Eiders on Tjörnin. The male is unmistakable, with its black and white plumage and green nape. The female is a brown bird, but can still be readily distinguished from all ducks, except other eider species, on the basis of size and head shape.
Photo: Overlooking Tjörnin is "The Spell Broken" by Icelandic sculptor Einar Jónsson (We saw many more of his works that evening.) Many connect this piece to the legend of St. George and the dragon, where St. George slew the dragon so he could save the princess from being eaten by it. In fact it is a mixture of a few old legends. Einar sometimes took pieces from different folk tales and religious fables and pieced them together to fit what he wanted to say. It depicts the victory of good over evil, and the rewards that follow when you choose the right path. Here the young woman is freed from an evil spell when the dragon is slain. She sheds the skin of the old crone she was cursed to look like and revealed is her beautiful true form. The statue was unveiled here in 1987.
Photo: Flowers in the park that surrounds Tjörnin.
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Photo: Fríkirkjan í Reykjavík (The Free Church in Reykjavik) across Tjörnin.
Photo: Diane and Mary Kay by Fríkirkjan í Reykjavík. This is a church which is apart from the State Church. It is an independent Lutheran free church of Iceland.
Photo: The church was consecrated on 22 February 1903.
Photo: Bird feeding on the lake shore, a popular pastime, has led to the lake being called "the biggest bread soup in the world".
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Photo: The Common Eider is both the largest of the four eider species and the largest duck found in Europe and in North America.
Photo: The male Common Eider is unmistakable, with its black and white plumage and green nape. This duck's call is "ah-ooo". The species is often readily approachable.
Photo: Photo of Lake Tjörnin taken on Day 1. On Day 2 we walked past the fine homes on the far shore.
Photo: Homes along the northwest shore of Tjörnin.
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