GSM 2013 March Death Valley - Day 7
Apr 28, 2013Public
Photo: Friday morning I hiked from Stovepipe Wells campground back to Mesquite Flats Sand Dunes.  This is the view west from the dunes toward the Panamint Range, with Stovepipe Wells in the center.
Photo: Typical desert vegetation near Mesquite Flat Sand Dunes, including creosote bush and mesquite
Photo: Dried mud near the dunes
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Photo: Dried mud with just a dusting of loose sand
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Photo: The Mesquite Flat Sand Dunes are at the northern end of the valley floor and are nearly surrounded by mountains on all sides.
Photo: The largest dune is called Star Dune and is relatively stable and stationary because it is at a point where the various winds that shape the dunes converge.
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Photo: The depth of the sand at the crest of Star Dune is 130–140 feet but this is small compared to other dunes in the area that have sand depths of up to 600–700 feet deep.
Photo: For scale, notice the person near the top of the left dune.
Photo: The primary source of the dune sands is probably the Cottonwood Mountains which lie to the north and northwest. The tiny grains of quartz and feldspar that form the sinuous sculptures that make up this dune field began as much larger pieces of solid rock.
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