GSM 2017 Nebraska Day 7 Part 1
Sep 15, 2017Public
Photo: On this day we explored the westernmost part of Nebraska. This album covers Scotts Bluff, shown on the map.
Photo: At Lake Minatare State Recreation Area, we awoke to a beautiful sunrise.
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Photo: Cathy greets the sunrise.
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Photo: Behind the West Wind Campground, where we pitched our tents, was a flood plain where the high water mark is clearly visible.
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Photo: Sherry snapped a photo of me as I returned to the campground.
Photo: Approaching Scotts Bluff from the west on the Old Oregon Trail Road.
Photo: Scotts Bluff National Monument in western Nebraska includes an important 19th-century landmark on the Oregon Trail and Mormon Trail. The National Monument contains multiple bluffs (steep hills) located on the south side of the North Platte River; it is named for one prominent bluff called Scotts Bluff, which rises over 800 feet above the plains at its highest point. The monument is composed of five rock formations named Crown Rock, Dome Rock, Eagle Rock, Saddle Rock, and Sentinel Rock.
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Photo: The collection of bluffs was first charted by non-native people in 1812 by the Astorian Expedition of fur traders traveling along the river. The expedition party noted the bluffs as the first large rock formations along the river where the Great Plains started giving way to the foothills of the Rocky Mountains. Their findings were not widely communicated because of the War of 1812.
Photo: In 1823 explorers rediscovered the route to the Rocky Mountains, and fur traders in the region relied on the bluffs as a landmark. European Americans named the most prominent bluff after Hiram Scott, a fur trader who died in 1828 near the bluff. The local Native Americans had called it Me-a-pa-te, "the hill that is hard to go around."
Photo: In the Visitor Center is this relief map of the area.
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