Iceland 2013 Day 5
Oct 16, 2013Public
Photo: Emily, Tom, Shannon, and Zane examine a hornito.
Photo: Hornitos are formed in lava flows and are small openings that release small quantities of lava.
Photo: Ralph examining another hornito.
Photo: Austin exploring a hornito.
Photo: Similar to spatter cones, Hornitos are rootless meaning they don't sit on top of the main vent like spatter cones. Instead they are usually created by the slow upwelling of lava through the roof of a lava tube.
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Photo: High pressure causes lava to ooze and spatter out. The lava builds up on the surface and solidifies creating the initial structure. Hornitos can grow and exceed 30 ft in height.
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Photo: Hot water pipeline (through bus window). It zigzags to allow for expansion and contraction.
Photo: View from the bus as we cross the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.
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Photo: Hveragerði - This area is part of the Hengill central volcano, and is geothermally active and experiences very frequent (usually minor) earthquakes.
Photo: Hveragerdi is known for its greenhouses, which are heated by hot water from volcanic hot springs.
Photo: Hveragerði contains a number of greenhouses and is a hotbed :-) for Icelandic horticulture.
Photo: Another mode of transportation (not ours).
Photo: Note the tire studs, which, according to our guide, are legal in Iceland until May 1. Although we visited after May 1, we frequently heard the distinctive sound of studded tires in Reykjavík and elsewhere.
Photo: View of the former coastline of Iceland, now considerably inland.
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Photo: Sign describing Seljalandsfoss.
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