GSM 2014 August North Dakota - Day 1
Jul 3, 2015Public
Photo: The name Makoshika (Ma-ko'-shi-ka) is a variant spelling of a Lakota phrase meaning 'bad land' or 'bad earth'. This park is the largest of Montana's state parks at more than 11,000 acres. It is located east of Glendive.
Photo: The park contains spectacular badlands which conceal dinosaur fossils.
Photo:
Photo:
Photo: The park contains rock from the Hell Creek Formation and dinosaurs such as Triceratops are found there.
Photo: In 1997, a fossil Thescelosaurus was found at Makoshika by an expedition led by Jack Horner and Bob Harmon.
Photo: GSM members listen to our guide in the Visitor Center, while nonchalantly ignoring prehistoric beasts swimming overhead.
Photo: The park contains rock from the Hell Creek Formation and dinosaurs such as Triceratops are found there.
Photo:
Photo:
Photo: Field trip participants rest before a long hike into the badlands of the park.
Photo: Today, the badlands of Makoshika are set aside for visitors to see and enjoy.
Photo: We admire the scenery before us (or maybe consider that every step down means a step back up later).
Photo: The park contains many hoodoos, as can be seen in this overview of Cap Rock Trail.
Photo: A hoodoo (also called a tent rock, fairy chimney, or earth pyramid) is a tall, thin spire of rock that protrudes from the bottom of an arid drainage basin or badland.
Photo: Hoodoos typically consist of relatively soft rock topped by harder, less easily eroded stone that protects each column from the elements.
Photo: Hoodoos generally form within sedimentary rock and volcanic rock formations.
Photo:
Photo:
Photo:
Photo:
Photo: Notice the natural bridge to the right. We'll traverse that in a few minutes.
Photo:
Photo: