ScooterForSale
Apr 27, 2013Public
Photo: This is the complete unit (plus the charger and user guide, not shown).
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Photo: Here the main control/status panel.  It's very simple to control, but clearly has sophisticated electronics behind it.  The operator sets the maximum speed on the dial, and then controls in-the-moment speed and forward/reverse by push levers below the hand grips.  The maximum speed from the push levers are proportionally limited by the maximum speed dial shown in the lower right of this photo.  If this sounds complicated, it isn't... the scooter is very easy to operate.Top speed is around 6 or 7 km/h.  With the max speed dial turned down, it can be set to top out at a crawl.
Photo: The chair easily lifts off for compact transportation (fits easily in the back of a small hatch-back).  Under normal operation, the chair is held in place by gravity.
Photo: With the chair removed, the steering arm collapses to below horizontal.  In this configuration, it is easy for an able-bodied person to get the scooter into a lower-to-the-ground vehicle, like a hatch-back or minivan.  I regular transported the scooter by myself in the back of our Pontiac Vibe, with one-half of the rear seat folded down -- leaving room in the Vibe for the driver and two passengers, and some storage space (enough for a small shopping trip).
Photo: This scooter with no parts attached.  Note the key slot... a key is required to turn it on.
Photo: When the rear basket/umbrella are not present, the seat swivels 360 degrees.  It locks into one of eight stops, each offset by 45 degrees.  Note how the control arm has been pushed far forward, giving plenty of room for the operator's legs to swing to the side.
Photo: Just showing the steering pivot.
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Photo: Not also how the armrests flip out of the way.
Photo: Here, the rear basket/canopy holder is attached.  It's locked in place with a clamping bolt/handle.Note the anti-tipping wheels.  They are surprisingly effective.  I tried agressively to make it tip accelerating up our steep driveway.  It momentarily "popped the wheelie", but didn't tip over.
Photo: With the canopy and rear basket installed.  The canopy is height adjustable, and can be folded down while remaining on the scooter.
Photo: Here's the entire unit (right side), with canopy, rear and front baskets.
Photo: Here's the entire unit (left side), with canopy, rear and front baskets.
Photo: The frame and undercarriage.   Tires are in good shape.  The frame splits at the mid-point (later photo) for packaging.
Photo: Close-up of the motor assembly.  The scratch is from when I took it for a test drive* and tried to get up a curb not designed for the disabled.The test drive was a 10 kilometre round trip, with a 170 lb load, from the Marigold area to Admirals Walk and return.  It finished easily, with plenty of juice to spare.
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Photo: Seat post is easily removable and height-adjustable.
Photo: With the battery cover removed.  The scooter operates on two, sealed, 12v, lead-acid batteries.  Both batteries were replaced (brand new) in 2012.Note the lifting handle at the bottom of the photo (this is accessible with the cover on).  Just beside the right anti-tipping wheel is a clutch release to allow the scooter to be rolled without a key.  Even with the clutch released, the electric brake will engage if it's pushed or rolls faster than a couple of km per hour.
Photo: With the battery cover removed.  Note the circuit breaker.The scooter operates on two, sealed, 12v, lead-acid batteries.  Both batteries were replaced (brand new) in 2012.
Photo: Here the disassembled unit (see next photo).
Photo: A close-up of the last photo.
Photo: This is the complete unit (plus the charger and user guide, not shown).