Furniture and Furnishings, Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY.
Nov 27, 2011Public
Photo: Processional cross.  Byzantine, ca. 1000–1050. Silver, silver-gilt.

The silver-gilt medallions on both sides of this exceptionally handsome processional cross make it unique among surviving Byzantine examples. On the face of the cross, at the center, is a medallion with a bust of the blessing of Christ, surrounded by an incised pattern of freely worked repoussé rinceau vine scrolls on each of the four arms, which together form a smaller cross. At the ends of the crossbar are medallions with images of the Virgin and of John the Baptist raising their hands in prayer toward the image of Christ--the standard composition in the Byzantine world. At the terminals of the vertical arm of the cross are the archangels Michael and Gabriel, respectively, each in a different Byzantine court costume. An elegant acanthus leaf decorates the gilded foot of the cross. A ribbon-like band outlines the cross.
http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/170006166
Photo: Sofa.  Probably by John H. Belter  (1804–1863)  American, New York.  Rosewood.

Compare: http://www.metmuseum.org/collections/search-the-collections/10007856
Photo: Detail of sofa  by John H. Belter  (1804–1863) .
Photo: Cabinet attributed to Daniel Pabst (1826-1910). Philadelphia, Mid-Atlantic, Pennsylvania. American. Walnut, maple, white pine, glass.
http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/10001120
Photo: Vases by Louis Comfort Tiffany (American, New York City, 1848–1933), ca. 1900–1915. Favrile glass.

Right: http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/10016764

Left: http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/10009757
Photo: Tiffany Vases. Favrile glass.

Blue (1893–94): http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/10009708

Yellow (1893): http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/10009727
Photo: Tiffany.  Favrile glass.

http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/10009729
http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/10009733
http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/10009735
http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/10009730
http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/10009740
Photo: Magnolias and Irises.  Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848-1933). American, New York City.  Leaded favrile glass, ca. 1908.

http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/10010151
Photo: Frank Lloyd Wright Room, 1912-1914. 

This was originally the living room in the Prairie-style lake house in Wayzata, Minnesota, created for Mr. and Mrs. Francis W. Little. The room served both as a family gathering place and as an informal concert hall. It is a light-filled pavilion, in which the division between interior and exterior has been minimized.

http://www.metmuseum.org/collections/galleries/the%20american%20wing/745
Photo: Window
Made by Frank Lloyd Wright  (American, Richland Center, Wisconsin 1867–1959, Phoenix, Arizona).  Leaded glass, 1912–15. 

http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/10008150
Photo: Imperial Caucasus Egg, St. Petersburg, 1893, presented by Alexander III to his wife Maria Feodorovna on Easter Sunday 1893.  The egg is made of yellow and varicoloured gold, silver, ruby enamel, rose-cut diamonds, portrait diamonds, platinum, ivory, pearls, rock crystal and watercolor on ivory. It commemorates the hunting lodge where Grand Duke George spent most of his life after being diagnosed with tuberculosis. Miniatures are revealed by opening four doors around the egg. Each door bears a diamond-set numeral of the year, forming the year 1893. Behind the hinged cover at the top is a portrait of the Grand Duke in his naval uniform. This is the first Imperial egg known to be dated. Ruby red enamel was used only one other time as Alexei's hemophilia was a constant worry for the family.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caucasus_%28Faberg%C3%A9_egg%29
Part of the Matilda Geddings Gray collection of Faberge and usually resides in the Cheekwood Botanical Garden and Museum of Art in Nashville, TN.
Photo: The Napoleonic egg, sometimes referred to as the Imperial Napoleonic egg, is a Fabergé egg, one of a series of fifty-two jewelled eggs made under the supervision of Peter Carl Fabergé. It was created in 1912 for the last Tsar of Russia Nicholas II as a gift to his mother the Dowager Empress Maria Fyodorovna. The egg is part of the Matilda Geddings Gray collection of Faberge and usually resides in the Cheekwood Botanical Garden and Museum of Art in Nashville, TN.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Napoleonic_%28Faberg%C3%A9_egg%29
Photo: Part of the Matilda Geddings Gray collection of Faberge and usually resides in the Cheekwood Botanical Garden and Museum of Art in Nashville, TN.

http://www.metmuseum.org/collections/search-the-collections?ft=*&who=House+of+Carl+Faberg%C3%A9&rpp=20&pg=1
Photo: Part of the Matilda Geddings Gray collection of Faberge and usually resides in the Cheekwood Botanical Garden and Museum of Art in Nashville, TN.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oZriPqqvbgI
Photo: Part of the Matilda Geddings Gray collection of Faberge and usually resides in the Cheekwood Botanical Garden and Museum of Art in Nashville, TN.
Photo: Imperial Lilies of the Valley Basket St. Petersburg, 1896.  Workmaster: attributed to August Wilhelm Holmström.  Fabergé’s floral masterpiece and a favorite possession of the Tsarina Alexandra Feodorovna. Yellow and green gold, silver, nephrite, pearl, rose cut diamond.  Part of the Matilda Geddings Gray collection of Faberge and usually resides in the Cheekwood Botanical Garden and Museum of Art in Nashville, TN.

http://www.cheekwood.org/Art/Faberge.aspx