Photo: This is a rather unusual incarnation of the Mørch GS6. The top plate was totally home made and enclosed the original steel top plate
Photo: The Unit is no. 425 and in this picture you can just about see the unusual way in which Mørch balanced the motor: little strips of electricians' tape (red) is placed on the external rotor. Note also how deceptively simple the bearing is: a narrow bronze sleve holding the steel axle of the platter. The nut that holds it in place is conical and therefore the tighter it is the tighter it holds the axle in place. Therefore the mechanical tolerances of the axle are extremely narrow: a friend of mine was in a hurry to buy a GS6 to replace his Linn Sondek and persuaded Mørch to let him have one that had not had its standard run-in of fourteen days. When he got home he put oil on the spindle and put it on the turntable and waited for it to sink down like it does on a Sondek. Three days later it still had not sunk down: it happily spun on its spindle, but was floating several centimetres higher than it should. When Mørch heard this he said, "Oh, I must have forgotten to drill the little hole that lets the air out!"
Photo: The motor is a 24 V Papst "Aussenläufer-motor". Where the Garrard 401 has lots of levers and gears  to move things around the mørch is elegantly simple: one steel rod frem the switch pulls the idler wheel towards the pulley and the choice of rotation speed is effected by lowering and raising the arm that holds the idler wheel. Note the strange bell-shaped piece of lead between the switch and the hole for the arm. It is glued in place and I have no idea what it is there for.
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The Unit is no. 425 and in this picture you can just about see the unusual way in which Mørch balanced the motor: little strips of electricians' tape (red) is placed on the external rotor. Note also how deceptively simple the bearing is: a narrow bronze sleve holding the steel axle of the platter. The nut that holds it in place is conical and therefore the tighter it is the tighter it holds the axle in place. Therefore the mechanical tolerances of the axle are extremely narrow: a friend of mine was in a hurry to buy a GS6 to replace his Linn Sondek and persuaded Mørch to let him have one that had not had its standard run-in of fourteen days. When he got home he put oil on the spindle and put it on the turntable and waited for it to sink down like it does on a Sondek. Three days later it still had not sunk down: it happily spun on its spindle, but was floating several centimetres higher than it should. When Mørch heard this he said, "Oh, I must have forgotten to drill the little hole that lets the air out!"