East Texas-2008
Aug 17, 2010Public
Photo: After meeting up with District Forester John Warner in Conroe, we made our first stop at the nearby Boy Scout camp, only to find that our state champion redbay (Persea borbonia) had been destroyed in a storm.
Photo: The good news was that we were quickly able to find a potential replacement redbay nearby!
Photo: John rests for a moment after beating the brush to locate another redbay nominee.... This one turned out to be our new state champion!
Photo: The proud owner of a big Eastern Redcedar (Juniperus virginiana).
Photo: My next stop brought me to San Augustine and Sabine counties in search of several champs and near-champs. A roadside park near Hemphill is home to this state champion Longleaf Pine (Pinus palustris).
Photo: Our search for the national champion Black Hickory (Carya texana) took us to a spot on the National Forest that had been devastated by the winds from Hurricane Rita in 2005. In fact, seven of the eight trees we did relocate had been destroyed by the storm.
Photo: The only champion not battered by Rita was this Littlehip Hawthorn (Crataegus spathulata).
Photo: District Forester Billy Whitworth (left) and Resource Specialist Ronnie Jones admire a really big American Sycamore (Platanus occidentalis) near Milam.
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Photo: "It's bigger than my office in here!"
Photo: In Nacogdoches County, District Forester John Boyette poses next to the national champion Blueberry Hawthorn (Crataegus brachyacantha).
Photo: Next stop: Rusk County.... Here, a resource specialist and District Forester Clint Hays (right) give scale to a giant Loblolly Pine (Pinus taeda).
Photo: This big pine probably was never harvested because of this split.
Photo: Nearby on a separate property, the same landowner owns this state champion loblolly pine.... At 130 feet tall it is, perhaps, the tallest tree in Texas!
Photo: The camera doesn't do justice to this monster tree.
Photo: Just imagine a whole forest of trees this size and you can get a picture of what the virgin forests of East Texas looked like!