My Family in the Great War. Pt 2. Private William John Moore 11946 Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers.
Feb 10, 2011Public
Photo: This is the grave of my Stepfather's Uncle - William John Moore, 11946, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers.

He joined the Army shortly after the outbreak of the Great War and served with the 5th Battalion of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers as part of 31st Brigade in the 10th (Irish) Division. 

While serving in Gallipoli in 1915, he was wounded and evacuated.

Once he recovered, he joined the 1st Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers in France.

On July 1st, 1916, the opening day of the battle of the Somme, he was killed, along with almost 20,000 others.


He lies now in Y Ravine Cemetery, Beaumont Hamel, Somme.
Photo: Private William John Moore 11946 Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers.



Photograph courtesy of:- https://sites.google.com/site/greatwarbelfast/home
Photo:
Photo: Photograph courtesy of the staff at the Newfoundland Memorial Park.
Photo: Registration of birth for William John Moore, 01/02/1895.
Photo: Census of Ireland, 1901, showing William John Moore aged 6.

(Possible) Year of birth - 1895, and aged 21 years when killed on the Somme in 1916.
Photo: Census of Ireland, 1901, showing William John Moore aged 6.

(Possible) Year of birth - 1895, and aged 21 years when killed on the Somme in 1916.
Photo: Census of Ireland, 1911, showing William John Moore, aged 16.
Photo: Census of Ireland, 1911, showing William John Moore, aged 16.
Photo: On joining the 5th Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, William Moore serves in Gallipoli as part of the 31st Infantry Brigade  in the 10th (Irish) Division.
Photo: 10TH (IRISH) DIVISION.
Photo: A Church Service at the 10th (Irish) Division's Basingstoke camp in 1915.
Photo: HMT Novian.

10th to 12th July 1915, the 10th Division is detailed for service in the Dardanelles. 

The 5th Battalion Royal Innskilling Fusiliers embark at Davenport aboard the HMT Novian.
Photo: S.S. Osmanieh as mentioned in the Battalion War Diary on the next page.
Mytilene - On August 6th, 1915, the 5th Battalion (along with the 6th Battalion) transfer to the S.S. Osmanieh and put to sea at 16:30 hrs.
At 04:30hrs, on August 7th, the ship anchors in Suvla Bay.
....................

The liner Osmanieh Captained by Lieutenant Commander D. R. Mason, was taken over for service as a fleet auxiliary during the First World War.  
She served during the Gallipoli Campaign. 
She is mentioned in several War Diaries for the period of the campaign, she also ran weekly mail and supply runs from Malta to Mudros for over a year in spite of constant attacks by submarines.
 
On Monday - 31st December, 1917, she was carrying troops and medical staff to Alexandria when she struck a mine laid by UC 34 under the command of Oberleutnant zue See Horst Obermuller at the entrance to the harbour. 
She sank very quickly taking with her: Lieutenant Commander D.R. Mason, 2 Officers,  21 Crew members and 167 Troops and 8 Nurses.
Photo: The 5th Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers arrive in Gallipoli.
Photo:
Photo:
Photo: December 1915.
Photo: The War Dairies, on the next few pages, will help identify some of the areas on this map.
Photo: 5th Battalion Casualty summary, August - September 1915.
Photo: 5th Battalion Casualty summary, August - September 1915.
Photo: Remains of a Landing Craft on 'A' Beach.

Photograph courtesy of Andrew MacKay. ©
Photo: The Salt Lake.

Photograph courtesy of Andrew MacKay. ©
Photo: View from Scimitar Hill, looking towards the Salt Lake, 'A' Beach and Suvla Bay.

Photograph courtesy of Andrew MacKay. ©